Venue 11 Pro and XPS 11 - Dell Active Stylus

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Venue 11 Pro and XPS 11 - Dell Active Stylus

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Does anyone have any insight on the Synaptic stylus being included with the new Venue 11 Pro? Will it be any good for digital art or is it exclusively for navigation and note taking? Does it have palm rejection? How many levels of sensitivity does it have?


P.S. I'm also looking at the new Dell XPS 11 and I believe it also uses the Synaptic stylus so the question applies to it as well.

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  • I can't answer this but I just wanted to echo the question.  I've been using pen tablets in business since 1995, and the absence of precise pen operation is a deal breaker for me.  Will the Venue 11 support a stylus or not?  It appears the Venue 8 does - here's hoping the Venue 11 does!

  • A little further digging into this reveals: http://www.dell.com/learn/us/en/uscorp1/secure/2013-10-02-venue-tablets-xps-laptops

    The Dell Venue 11 Pro, also based on Windows 8.1, provides ultimate 2-in-1 flexibility with the power of an Ultrabook, convenience of a detachable keyboard and experience of a desktop. Unlike competitive tablets, it has a user removable/replaceable battery, and its large, Full HD display with wide viewing angles makes it easy to read and create content while staying mobile. It is also available with a variety of keyboard and stylus options:

    • Dell Active Stylus makes it easy to annotate, draw or take notes.
    • Dell Slim Keyboard, designed for travel, also serves as a cover for the screen when folded up.
    • Dell Mobile Keyboard with integrated battery provides all day productivity with a full-sized keyboard while extending the battery life.
    • Dell Tablet Desktop Dock delivers full productivity on a desk with USB 3.0 ports, and dual display out ports for display extension.

  • According to Synaptics' press note there is palm rejection. Honestly it would be incredibly bad for 2013 to have an active digitizer without.

    Something I am more concerned about is why there's apparently no button on it for right-clicking. I absolutely despise having to hold the pen in one place to open context menus. Furthermore any application or game which captures the mouse pointer will not be able to have a right click at all.

    I find it hard to fathom why one would cater to the needs of business users - I mean - finally! Windows on a lightweight bay trail tablet - and not include a button on the pen. And there I thought the time to put away my old, loud and hot Lenovo convertible in favor of something this light, silent and sleek had come - but no. And since it's not Wacom tech but synaptics I can't even use one of the styli I already own.

    Sorry for the rant :-/

  • Unfortunately the stylus seems to be pretty horrible on the Dell Venue 8 Pro. At least compared to other active styluses. You can find more info in this thread starting at page 32. http://forum.tabletpcreview.com/dell/59202-venue-8-pro-owner-s-lounge-32.html.

  • kuru
    Something I am more concerned about is why there's apparently no button on it for right-clicking.

     

    There actually is a rocker button on the pen so you can have different button functions at your finger tips. That doesn't change the fact that the stylus overall needs some serious fixing.

     

     

     

    thpen, so you can have different button operations

  • I ordered 10 Venue 11s for our department.    Out of the box two had hardware issues and were returned  for repair.   Perhaps the worst part of this experience has been the performance of the pens.   For handwriting recognition in Windows they are very inadequate.   If the pressure sensitivity could be turned off I believe they might work.   While pressure sensitivity makes sense for drawing, etc. it wakes no sense  when handwriting in the tablet input panel.   Curiously,  a capacitive pen used for this purpose works much better than  the "active pen."   This is so because the capacity pen does not have pressure sensitivity,   I tried to speak to a Dell Service tech about this but realized  very quickly that the knew more about the tablet and Windows  settings than he did. 

  • jwilltx0
    If the pressure sensitivity could be turned off I believe they might work.

    Depending on the app/software, it can be, any many users do exactly that.

  • No, it can't be turned off in the Windows 8.1 input panel which is consistent in all programs.   Perhaps there is a registry tweak I don't know about.    Also,  in tablets with Wacom digitizers  pressure sensitivity is off when using the Windows input panel.

  • No, I wasn't talking Windows 8.1 but individual programs (as I mentioned above), which indeed will affect pen behavior.

    Refer, for example, to Windows Journal (see the highlighted pressure sensitivity option in the attachment below; found under Tools, Options, Pen Settings); this also applies to other programs, if you would check them out.

     

  • You seem to be missing the point.  I am well aware of the pressure sensitivity setting in Windows Journal and other programs.  These settings do not influence the Windows input panel.  So, my original post still applies.  We need a pressure sensitivity setting for the Windows input panel.  Thanks, by the way for being so insistent to answer a questions I did not ask and then imply that I didn't know what I was talking about.  This curiously seems like the same approach Dell takes with service questions.

  • jwilltx0

    You seem to be missing the point.  I am well aware of the pressure sensitivity setting in Windows Journal and other programs.  These settings do not influence the Windows input panel.  So, my original post still applies.  We need a pressure sensitivity setting for the Windows input panel.  Thanks, by the way for being so insistent to answer a questions I did not ask and then imply that I didn't know what I was talking about.  This curiously seems like the same approach Dell takes with service questions.

    LOL.  Thank you for your superior attitude, as well as your being grateful that someone would actually spend time responding to you, let alone attaching an annotated screen shot.   Wink

    However, as I read your initial inquiry, at no point did it limit itself to the Windows input panel.  ("Perhaps the worst part of this experience has been the performance of the pens.   For handwriting recognition in Windows they are very inadequate.   If the pressure sensitivity could be turned off I believe they might work.   While pressure sensitivity makes sense for drawing, etc. it wakes no sense  when handwriting in the tablet input panel.")  And so I responded more generally.  Although not beneficial for you, based on what you now write, perhaps it will be, for others.  Sorry if I did not understand your true intent from what you wrote, or how proficient you might or might not be.

    You have a good day now--it's been a pleasure.  And at times, it actually can be a good thing to assume that people have intended the best.

    And by the way, I don't disagree with you as to the Windows input panel itself; and I'm glad that your knowledge about the pressure sensitivity setting extends beyond that, to the point I was trying to point out.