Reinstalling OS - Mirrored Hard Drives

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Reinstalling OS - Mirrored Hard Drives

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My old Dimension E520, running WinXP Pro SP3, would still have some utility for my purposes if I could reinstall the OS and start from scratch. Because is has a pair of mirrored hard drives, I have no idea what is involved or how to go about reinstalling the OS. If anyone can provide any info or point me in the right direction, I would appreciate it greatly!

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  • The mirroring does not matter.

    Drive Letters mean ZERO.

    There is no C: drive on a DELL Drive.

    The type DE Partition is changed to 06 (FAT16) usually 100 meg or less DIAG DOS partition.

    The Type DB Partition is changed to 0C (FAT32) usually 8 to 12 Gigs At the End of the Drive.

    Can also be type 07 NTFS if the CTRL F11 partition is using Norton 10.X

    The image file is named fi.gho and stored in the DSR partition.

    The entire partition is "hidden" to make it difficult for the customer to accidentally erase it.

    If needed, the customer can later use this image to return XP to its "as-shipped" state.

    Due to filesystem considerations, very large images may be split into a group of files

    . Note the image consists of the entire fileset, and no one file in the set is usable by itself.

    If the image consists of a group of files, the first file is fi.gho, and the rest of the files are named sequentially, starting with fi000001.ghs.

    The image in a DOS-style DSR partition is in Ghost 2003 format.(THIS MEANS THE IMAGE IS ON TYPE 0C FAT32X Partition)Hidden as type DB

    PTEDIT can unhide this.

    The image in a WinPE-style DSR partition is in Ghost 8.3 format. (THIS MEANS THE IMAGE IS ON TYPE 07 NTFS Partition)Hidden as type DB

    PTEDIT32 can unhide this.

    the C: drive is the Diag partition, the D: drive is the OS, the E: drive is the Recovery partition.

    Mirroring does not matter because the BIOS sees the Mirror as 1 Single drive.

    PTEDIT from DOS or from Windows XP will allow you to UNHIDE the partitions that have the Diag and the Recovery partition.

    DEPENDS ON WHICH you have.

    Only the CTRL F11 Symantec version can be copied.

    The f8 dELL dATA SAFE VERSION cannot be recovered, cloned, copied.

    If you did not repartition and reformat your drives and they are still working then all of that information can be recovered onto another media
    like a usb flash drive.

    If you remove your drives and carefully lable them you can make a drive with win9x msdos and run dsrfix on it then put
    back the diag and recovery partition data and then re run dsrfix and then ctrl f11 recover.

    The ctrl f11 image file is ghost.

    If you modified/formatted/deleted the partitions then that method is GONE FOREVER.

    These instructions make use of the following utilities, though you may use any suitable alternatives if you prefer. I've chosen to illustrate with these particular tools because they are free and available to anyone.

    MBR Saver (mbrsaver.com)
    My utility to save and restore your MBR sector is bundled with my Dsrfix, which you can download from www.goodells.net/dell/restore/files/dsrfix.zip.

    PowerQuest Partition Table Editor (ptedit.exe)
    Download from ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/english_us_canada/tools/pq/utilities/.
    PTEDIT.ZIP is the DOSversion Runs in WIN98SE DOS.
    PTEDIT32.ZIP is the XP version Runs in Windows XP.

    DSR Versions

    There are two basic types of the DSR partition, differing in the operating system to which they boot. Early types of the DSR partition boot to DOS, a 16-bit operating system. The later type boots a WinPE 32-bit operating system.

    All DSR versions use the FAT32 file system, so the operating system booted has to be FAT32-aware. The earliest versions of the DSR partition booted to MS-DOS 7.1 (the version of DOS from Windows 98). Later, Dell began using DRMK, their own variation of DOS. These are 16-bit operating systems.    (Note to reader: DRMK apparantly stands for "Dell Real-Mode Kernel". The purpose of DRMK may be to avoid paying licensing fees to Microsoft, not to add extra DOS functions.)

    When Dell began shipping computers with Ghost 10 preloaded, the DSR partition was changed to WinPE, a 32-bit operating system.    (Note to reader: PE, or "Preinstallation Environment", is what you boot to if you boot from a Windows 2000 or XP installation CD.)

    How the DSR System Checks for Partition Changes

    After the Dell MBR boots a DSR-DOS partition as drive C:, the autoexec.bat file runs dsrcheck.exe to examine the disk's partition layout. If things are not as it expects, the restore process is aborted.    (Note to self: I haven't yet examined how a WinPE DSR checks for partition changes.)

    Autoexec.bat launches the command "c:\bin\dsrcheck.exe  run". DSRcheck provides principally two functions: to evaluate the state of the computer's partition layout to determine whether to allow the restore process to proceed, and to return the partition table (specifically, the partition-type indicators and active flag) to its normal state. This latter function is necessary because the Dell-specific method of booting the restore partition (Ctrl+F11) altered the partition table.

    DSRcheck examines the following:

    • Current partition table must match a reference copy of the original, else error: "Partition change detected".

    • Sector with reference partition table must end in '55 AA', else error: "Data needed for restoring has been corrupted".

    • PBR 1 must be FAT16, else error: "Partition change detected".

    • PBR 1 label must be "DellUtility", else error: "Partition change detected".

    • PBR 2 must be NTFS.

    • PBR 3 must be the active partition, else error: "Dell Restore partition was not found".
      (Note to reader: remember that Ctrl+F11 made the 'DB' partition the active partition.)

    • PBR 3 must be FAT32X, else error: "Dell Restore partition was not found".

    • PBR 3 label must be "DellRestore", else error: "Dell Restore partition was not found".

    If any of the above checks fail, DSRcheck signals autoexec.bat to abort the restore process.

    The two label checks are on the name in the partition's boot sector, not the label in the partition's root directory. The check is case-sensitive.    (Note to reader: most people may not realize there are actually two places a partition name can be stored. It's not easy to set lowercase characters here, as the DOS command, 'LABEL', always converts input to uppercase.)

    The reference copy of the partition table is stored in Sector 18 (decimal) of the Restore partition, at offset 01BE-01FDh. This is a duplicate of the original partition table at offset 01BE-01FDh in the disk's master boot sector.

    DSRcheck first checks that the sector containing the reference partition table ends in '55 AA'. If not, DSRcheck aborts, leaving the real partition table with the descriptor types and active flag in a mess--these were altered by the Ctrl+F11 sequence, and are not cleaned up when DSRcheck aborts.

    If the sector with the reference partition table ends in '55 AA', DSRcheck changes the descriptor types in the real partition table to DE/07/DB, and proceeds to compare the partition table to the reference partition table. DSRcheck resets the active partition indicator based on which partition is marked active in the reference partition table.

    Warning: it appears this reference sector includes boot code besides the partition table and the usual '55 AA' bytes at the end of the sector. However, the alternate MBR boot code is different from the real MBR boot code, so should not be used. Nonetheless, DSRcheck compares only the partition table (and the trailing '55 AA'). It does not check any other part of this reference sector such as the MBR or DiskID sections, and those parts of the reference sector can actually even be blank.    (Note to self: I haven't yet figured out what the boot code in this sector is for. Perhaps it is an artifact leftover from the system build process.)

    Ctrl+F11 works as long as the partition is marked type 'DB' and is not already the active partition. That's enough for the Dell MBR to boot the partition. DSRcheck, however, is pickier. As seen above, DSRcheck imposes additional restrictions in order to let the restore process proceed. For example, if you have repartitioned the hard disk, the Dell MBR may still be intact and Ctrl+F11 will boot the DSR partition, but the partition table will no longer match the reference partition table so DSRcheck will not allow the restore process to continue.

    If the hard disk passes DSRcheck's scrutiny, the autoexec.bat script asks you (twice!) to confirm that you wish to overwrite the XP partition. Then it launches the script file c:\bat\recover.bat, which in turn automatically runs c:\bin\recover.exe to restore the Ghost image file, c:\img\fi.gho.    (Note to reader: recover.exe is a Dell-branded, crippled variation of Symantec Ghost 2003--it will only restore an image file, it will not copy a partition, create an image file, or work over a network. Ghost 2003 can be used to read and write image files compatible with recover.exe.)

    Fixing PBR Descriptor Alerts



    Dell calls each partition table entry a "Partition Boot Record descriptor", as it describes where the partition's boot record is and what type of file system it contains. It is this "Type" indicator that Dell tinkers with for the Dell Utility partition and the Dell Restore partition. Note the partition itself is not altered, but changing this one byte in the partition table descriptor has the effect of disguising the partition from operating systems and utilities. Even sophisticated utilities like Partition Magic identify the disguised partitions as "EISA", "CTOS", or "CP/M" instead of "FAT16" and "FAT32".

    The easiest way of correcting the partition-type indicators is with ptedit. Boot from a DOS boot disk, load a DOS mouse driver, and launch ptedit.exe. (Note to reader: ptedit is tough to use without a mouse, so make sure you load a DOS mouse driver before launching ptedit.)

    Use the mouse and keyboard to change the entries in the 'Type' column. A normal Dell system should show 'DE' as the first partition's type, '07' for the second partition, and 'DB' for the third partition.

    A value of '80' in the Boot column indicates the active partition. A normal Dell system should show '80' for the second partition, the Windows NTFS (Type-07) partition. There must be only one active partition, so make sure the other three partitions show '00' in the Boot column.



    Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues here:

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    The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating.

All Replies
  • The XP Restore partition is on the drive. It can be cloned with Ghost or some other utility.  However it sounds like you

    destroyed the Recovery partition by reformatting and mirroring.

    Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues here:

    Dell - Unresolved Customer Service Issues

    I do not work for Dell. I too am a user.

    The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating.

  • SpeedStep, thanks for your reply. This machine came from Dell with mirrored drives and the OS installed. As far as I can tell, it does not have the recovery image on it. Original Win XP disks were included. It appears my only choice is to install from the disks. I just do not understand how to deal with the mirrored drives. If I do a normal reinstall to C: will the mirrored D: "take care of itself?"

  • Cyber Ernie

    SpeedStep, thanks for your reply. This machine came from Dell with mirrored drives and the OS installed. As far as I can tell, it does not have the recovery image on it. Original Win XP disks were included. It appears my only choice is to install from the disks. I just do not understand how to deal with the mirrored drives. If I do a normal reinstall to C: will the mirrored D: "take care of itself?"

    There is a Dell journal HERE on how to manually reinstall your Operating System. If you have damaged your D restore partition, then you will have to use this method.

          

    If my answer Was helpful?  Please let me know by clicking on the 'Did this answer your question' and clicking on the Yes button.  Thanks.


     

     

  • RobinBredin, nothing has been damaged. Presumably, the C and D drives are identical. As far as I have been able to determine, there was never any restore partition on the system. Manual reinstallation does seem to be my only option but I do not understand how that will work, or what I need to do, because of the two mirrored drives.

  • Cyber Ernie

    RobinBredin, nothing has been damaged. Presumably, the C and D drives are identical. As far as I have been able to determine, there was never any restore partition on the system. Manual reinstallation does seem to be my only option but I do not understand how that will work, or what I need to do, because of the two mirrored drives.

    Have you tried this method HERE from the dell journal.

          

    If my answer Was helpful?  Please let me know by clicking on the 'Did this answer your question' and clicking on the Yes button.  Thanks.


     

     

  • Yes, that is the path that led me to conclude that no image file exists from which to restore.

  • Drive Letters don't mean much.  The PARTITION is not 2nd aka D:

    The Dell Data Safe partition is 10 to 12 Gigs at the beginning of the drive after the 100 meg Diag partition.

    The Symantec Ghost restore partition is a Hidden Type DE partition (actually FAT32 DOS) or NTFS  at the End of the drive where the Drive Total Size is LESS THAN 120 gigs.   Ghost restore with NTFS partition uses GHOST32 ,

    Ghost restore with FAT32 partition uses GHOST for DOS.

    The Dell Datasafe partition is Encrypted and cannot be copied or cloned as is the NTFS version with Ghost 10.x

    Inside the Dell PC Restore Partition

    The Ghost Partition is used via CTRL F11

    Dell Data Safe 2.0 uses F8

    Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues here:

    Dell - Unresolved Customer Service Issues

    I do not work for Dell. I too am a user.

    The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating.

  • SpeedStep, I am trying to understand what you are telling me here and also the info on your "Inside the Dell PC Restore Partition" page. I am clearly over my head! Does it matter, or clarify anything, that I am dealing with two separate physical hard drives, C: and D: on my machine are not partitions on a singles drive?

  • The mirroring does not matter.

    Drive Letters mean ZERO.

    There is no C: drive on a DELL Drive.

    The type DE Partition is changed to 06 (FAT16) usually 100 meg or less DIAG DOS partition.

    The Type DB Partition is changed to 0C (FAT32) usually 8 to 12 Gigs At the End of the Drive.

    Can also be type 07 NTFS if the CTRL F11 partition is using Norton 10.X

    The image file is named fi.gho and stored in the DSR partition.

    The entire partition is "hidden" to make it difficult for the customer to accidentally erase it.

    If needed, the customer can later use this image to return XP to its "as-shipped" state.

    Due to filesystem considerations, very large images may be split into a group of files

    . Note the image consists of the entire fileset, and no one file in the set is usable by itself.

    If the image consists of a group of files, the first file is fi.gho, and the rest of the files are named sequentially, starting with fi000001.ghs.

    The image in a DOS-style DSR partition is in Ghost 2003 format.(THIS MEANS THE IMAGE IS ON TYPE 0C FAT32X Partition)Hidden as type DB

    PTEDIT can unhide this.

    The image in a WinPE-style DSR partition is in Ghost 8.3 format. (THIS MEANS THE IMAGE IS ON TYPE 07 NTFS Partition)Hidden as type DB

    PTEDIT32 can unhide this.

    the C: drive is the Diag partition, the D: drive is the OS, the E: drive is the Recovery partition.

    Mirroring does not matter because the BIOS sees the Mirror as 1 Single drive.

    PTEDIT from DOS or from Windows XP will allow you to UNHIDE the partitions that have the Diag and the Recovery partition.

    DEPENDS ON WHICH you have.

    Only the CTRL F11 Symantec version can be copied.

    The f8 dELL dATA SAFE VERSION cannot be recovered, cloned, copied.

    If you did not repartition and reformat your drives and they are still working then all of that information can be recovered onto another media
    like a usb flash drive.

    If you remove your drives and carefully lable them you can make a drive with win9x msdos and run dsrfix on it then put
    back the diag and recovery partition data and then re run dsrfix and then ctrl f11 recover.

    The ctrl f11 image file is ghost.

    If you modified/formatted/deleted the partitions then that method is GONE FOREVER.

    These instructions make use of the following utilities, though you may use any suitable alternatives if you prefer. I've chosen to illustrate with these particular tools because they are free and available to anyone.

    MBR Saver (mbrsaver.com)
    My utility to save and restore your MBR sector is bundled with my Dsrfix, which you can download from www.goodells.net/dell/restore/files/dsrfix.zip.

    PowerQuest Partition Table Editor (ptedit.exe)
    Download from ftp://ftp.symantec.com/public/english_us_canada/tools/pq/utilities/.
    PTEDIT.ZIP is the DOSversion Runs in WIN98SE DOS.
    PTEDIT32.ZIP is the XP version Runs in Windows XP.

    DSR Versions

    There are two basic types of the DSR partition, differing in the operating system to which they boot. Early types of the DSR partition boot to DOS, a 16-bit operating system. The later type boots a WinPE 32-bit operating system.

    All DSR versions use the FAT32 file system, so the operating system booted has to be FAT32-aware. The earliest versions of the DSR partition booted to MS-DOS 7.1 (the version of DOS from Windows 98). Later, Dell began using DRMK, their own variation of DOS. These are 16-bit operating systems.    (Note to reader: DRMK apparantly stands for "Dell Real-Mode Kernel". The purpose of DRMK may be to avoid paying licensing fees to Microsoft, not to add extra DOS functions.)

    When Dell began shipping computers with Ghost 10 preloaded, the DSR partition was changed to WinPE, a 32-bit operating system.    (Note to reader: PE, or "Preinstallation Environment", is what you boot to if you boot from a Windows 2000 or XP installation CD.)

    How the DSR System Checks for Partition Changes

    After the Dell MBR boots a DSR-DOS partition as drive C:, the autoexec.bat file runs dsrcheck.exe to examine the disk's partition layout. If things are not as it expects, the restore process is aborted.    (Note to self: I haven't yet examined how a WinPE DSR checks for partition changes.)

    Autoexec.bat launches the command "c:\bin\dsrcheck.exe  run". DSRcheck provides principally two functions: to evaluate the state of the computer's partition layout to determine whether to allow the restore process to proceed, and to return the partition table (specifically, the partition-type indicators and active flag) to its normal state. This latter function is necessary because the Dell-specific method of booting the restore partition (Ctrl+F11) altered the partition table.

    DSRcheck examines the following:

    • Current partition table must match a reference copy of the original, else error: "Partition change detected".

    • Sector with reference partition table must end in '55 AA', else error: "Data needed for restoring has been corrupted".

    • PBR 1 must be FAT16, else error: "Partition change detected".

    • PBR 1 label must be "DellUtility", else error: "Partition change detected".

    • PBR 2 must be NTFS.

    • PBR 3 must be the active partition, else error: "Dell Restore partition was not found".
      (Note to reader: remember that Ctrl+F11 made the 'DB' partition the active partition.)

    • PBR 3 must be FAT32X, else error: "Dell Restore partition was not found".

    • PBR 3 label must be "DellRestore", else error: "Dell Restore partition was not found".

    If any of the above checks fail, DSRcheck signals autoexec.bat to abort the restore process.

    The two label checks are on the name in the partition's boot sector, not the label in the partition's root directory. The check is case-sensitive.    (Note to reader: most people may not realize there are actually two places a partition name can be stored. It's not easy to set lowercase characters here, as the DOS command, 'LABEL', always converts input to uppercase.)

    The reference copy of the partition table is stored in Sector 18 (decimal) of the Restore partition, at offset 01BE-01FDh. This is a duplicate of the original partition table at offset 01BE-01FDh in the disk's master boot sector.

    DSRcheck first checks that the sector containing the reference partition table ends in '55 AA'. If not, DSRcheck aborts, leaving the real partition table with the descriptor types and active flag in a mess--these were altered by the Ctrl+F11 sequence, and are not cleaned up when DSRcheck aborts.

    If the sector with the reference partition table ends in '55 AA', DSRcheck changes the descriptor types in the real partition table to DE/07/DB, and proceeds to compare the partition table to the reference partition table. DSRcheck resets the active partition indicator based on which partition is marked active in the reference partition table.

    Warning: it appears this reference sector includes boot code besides the partition table and the usual '55 AA' bytes at the end of the sector. However, the alternate MBR boot code is different from the real MBR boot code, so should not be used. Nonetheless, DSRcheck compares only the partition table (and the trailing '55 AA'). It does not check any other part of this reference sector such as the MBR or DiskID sections, and those parts of the reference sector can actually even be blank.    (Note to self: I haven't yet figured out what the boot code in this sector is for. Perhaps it is an artifact leftover from the system build process.)

    Ctrl+F11 works as long as the partition is marked type 'DB' and is not already the active partition. That's enough for the Dell MBR to boot the partition. DSRcheck, however, is pickier. As seen above, DSRcheck imposes additional restrictions in order to let the restore process proceed. For example, if you have repartitioned the hard disk, the Dell MBR may still be intact and Ctrl+F11 will boot the DSR partition, but the partition table will no longer match the reference partition table so DSRcheck will not allow the restore process to continue.

    If the hard disk passes DSRcheck's scrutiny, the autoexec.bat script asks you (twice!) to confirm that you wish to overwrite the XP partition. Then it launches the script file c:\bat\recover.bat, which in turn automatically runs c:\bin\recover.exe to restore the Ghost image file, c:\img\fi.gho.    (Note to reader: recover.exe is a Dell-branded, crippled variation of Symantec Ghost 2003--it will only restore an image file, it will not copy a partition, create an image file, or work over a network. Ghost 2003 can be used to read and write image files compatible with recover.exe.)

    Fixing PBR Descriptor Alerts



    Dell calls each partition table entry a "Partition Boot Record descriptor", as it describes where the partition's boot record is and what type of file system it contains. It is this "Type" indicator that Dell tinkers with for the Dell Utility partition and the Dell Restore partition. Note the partition itself is not altered, but changing this one byte in the partition table descriptor has the effect of disguising the partition from operating systems and utilities. Even sophisticated utilities like Partition Magic identify the disguised partitions as "EISA", "CTOS", or "CP/M" instead of "FAT16" and "FAT32".

    The easiest way of correcting the partition-type indicators is with ptedit. Boot from a DOS boot disk, load a DOS mouse driver, and launch ptedit.exe. (Note to reader: ptedit is tough to use without a mouse, so make sure you load a DOS mouse driver before launching ptedit.)

    Use the mouse and keyboard to change the entries in the 'Type' column. A normal Dell system should show 'DE' as the first partition's type, '07' for the second partition, and 'DB' for the third partition.

    A value of '80' in the Boot column indicates the active partition. A normal Dell system should show '80' for the second partition, the Windows NTFS (Type-07) partition. There must be only one active partition, so make sure the other three partitions show '00' in the Boot column.



    Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues here:

    Dell - Unresolved Customer Service Issues

    I do not work for Dell. I too am a user.

    The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating.

  • http://www.goodells.net/dellrestore/manualrestore/

    THIS DOES NOT WORK IF YOU HAVE TYPE 07 NTFS DSR. 

    IT ALSO DOES NOT WORK IF YOU HAVE REMOVED THE DSR PARTITIONS AND REFORMATTED.

    Manual Recovery from a DOS-Style DSR Partition - Step-by-Step

    (Note: these screens show the Norton Ghost 2003 program. However, the Dell recover.exe program will look nearly identical to this.)



    Step 01: Open the restore partition

    Boot to DOS from the Dsrfix CD.
    You can download the DSRFIX.ISO file from here:
    download the dsrfix.zip archive file and extract dsrfix.com or dsrfixcd.iso. You may optionally wish to include ptedit.exe from ptedit.zip
    To make a DOS boot floppy: You will need a 1.44MB floppy disk and a machine with a floppy drive. Visit www.bootdisk.com and download the file to make a Win98 SE bootdisk. Use the file to make your own boot floppy. Copy dsrfix.com (and ptedit.exe, if desired) onto a second floppy disk. Boot from the bootdisk, then swap the floppies so you can run Dsrfix.
    (Note to reader: The other files in the archive are supplemental. The only file you need to copy to floppy disk is dsrfix.com.)

    To make a bootable CD: You will need a machine with a CD/DVD burner and your burning software must be capable of creating a CD from an ISO image. Nero and Roxio EasyCD Creator include that capability. If you don't have either of those, a very simple freeware tool that can do this is ImgBurn, which can be downloaded from www.imgburn.com. Download ImgBurn and install it. Launch ImgBurn and use the iso file, dsrfixcd.iso, to create a CD. Boot from the CD and run Dsrfix.
    (Note to reader: The other files in the archive are supplemental. Dsrfixcd.iso is the only file required to make a bootable CD.)

    Note: a drawback to this method is that a CD is read-only, so if you boot from a CD you cannot save a dumpfile or backup your MBR to the CD. However, if your system does not have a floppy drive, you may need to forego saving these.

    To make a bootable flash drive: Your computer's bios must support booting from a USB device. (I believe all Dell computers shipped since the advent of the PC-Restore system probably support booting from a USB device.) Flash drives have become quite inexpensive and ubiquitous. There are plenty of good instructions on the Internet about how to make a flash drive bootable. Do a google search for "usb bootable flash drive" and find a method you like. After making your flash drive bootable, copy dsrfix.com (and ptedit.exe, if desired) onto it. Insert the flash drive into a USB port and reboot the computer.
    (Note to reader: The other files in the archive are supplemental. The only file you need to copy to the flash drive is dsrfix.com.)

    Warning: the computer will treat your flash drive as the first "hard disk" in the computer. Your real hard disk will typically be shifted to second in order. When you run Dsrfix, make sure you use the /81 switch to read the "second" disk! If you forget to include the command-line switch, Dsrfix will read the MBR of the flash drive instead.



    At the  A:>  prompt, enter the command: " ptedit " to launch the PowerQuest Partition Table Editor.

    The row for the main XP partition will start with  07   80  in the first two columns. Change to  07  00 .

    The row for the DSR partition will start with  DB   00  in the first two columns. Change to  0C   80 .

    Do not change any other fields. You should have only one  80  in the  Boot  column.

    Click the  Save Changes  button to save the changes.

    REBOOT. (A reboot is required for the changes to be recognized.)

    Step 02: Start recovery program

    Boot to DOS from the Dsrfix CD.

    At the  A:>  prompt, enter the command: " c: " to switch to the C: drive.

    At the  C:>  prompt, enter the command: " cd  c:\img " to switch to the IMG directory.

    At the  C:\IMG>  prompt, enter the command: " c:\bin\recover " to launch the Dell Recovery utility.

    Click  OK  to skip the copyright screen.

    From the menu, select  Local .

    Step 03: Select task

    Select  Partition  from the 'Action' flyout menu.

    Select  From Image  from the 'Partition' flyout menu.

    Step 04: Select image file

    Select the  C:  [DellRestore]  local drive.

    Select the  FI.GHO  file.

    Click the  Open  button to continue.

    Step 05: Select source partition

    Highlight the  Primary  07  NTFS  partition.

    Click the  OK  button to continue.

    Step 06: Select destination drive

    Select your main hard disk.

    Click the  OK  button to continue.

    Step 07: Select destination partition

    Select your main XP partition.

    Clue: this should always be a  Primary   07   NTFS  partition. If you have more than one partition like this, make sure you figure out and select the right one!

    Click the  OK  button to continue.

    Step 08: Ghost

    You are now ready to delete the main XP partition on your hard disk and replace it with the image of the partition that is in the FI.GHO backup file.

    Click the  Yes  button to continue.

    Step 09: Ghost

    The restore process will take some time.

    When it finishes, exit from the program.

    Step 10: Ptedit

    Boot to DOS from the Dsrfix CD.

    Execute the command: " ptedit " to launch the PowerQuest Partition Table Editor.

    Undo the changes you made in Step 01.

    The row for the main XP partition will start with  07   00  in the first two columns. Change back to  07   80 .

    The row for the DSR partition will start with  0C   80  in the first two columns. Change back to  DB   00 .

    Do not change any other fields. You should have only one  80  in the  Boot  column.

    Click the  Save Changes  button to save the changes.
    Finished.

    The main XP partition should now be restored to its contents as it was when originally shipped.

    Reboot and let the computer boot into XP.

    Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues here:

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    The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating.

  • Sounds like Cyber Ernie is asking how to undo a RAID 1 setup.

  • SpeedStep, thank you for all your help. I admit that I am a little overwhelmed, but I think this actually answers my question:

    "Mirroring does not matter because the BIOS sees the Mirror as 1 Single drive."

    If I can work through it, the rest should get me back to as shipped condition. That, of course, was my goal from the start.

  • Tom Green, I would prefer preserving the RAID 1 and getting a clean install of the OS. Based on info provided by SpeedStep, I think I can do that, now.

  • In short what I am saying is that if this Raid Setup came from Dell you can Save an image of the Diag and recovery partitions.  You can then replace All drives and repair the raid AFTER getting the OS reinstalled.

    If However the drive was REFORMATTED and made into a raid this would DESTROY FOREVER the hidden Images.

    You should be able to download PTEDIT32 and Run from XP to "SEE" if the Hidden partitions do in fact exist.

    The DSR partition will begin to boot when Ctrl+F11 is pressed at the black screen with the Dell blue line.

    KEEP IN MIND THAT THE CTRL F11 "RESTORE" DESTROYS ANY AND ALL DATA ON THE DRIVE.

    So backup your files first.

    Screen Shots from a PE-Type Restore  (NTFS TYPE 07) Partition



    The DSR partition will begin to boot when Ctrl+F11 is pressed at the black screen with the Dell blue line.

    The Symantec Recovery Environment menu.

    Two confirmation screens warn you that the XP partition will be overwritten.

    The image is being restored, overwriting the disk's second partition.

    Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues here:

    Dell - Unresolved Customer Service Issues

    I do not work for Dell. I too am a user.

    The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating.